The Beginning and End of Nature

When people talk about the end of nature, what exactly is this nature that has ended? It’s not like the whole universe imploded. Earth is still spinning. Nature isn’t the universe, and it’s not a planet. It’s nature. Nature is an idea, a word, a symbol, which is not to say that it is merely those things. Nature is also whatever reality people were referring to when they used the idea, word, or symbol of “nature.” That reality sufficiently degraded so as to indicate to many people that it has ended. There are still organisms, ecosystems, lakes, rivers, atmospheric conditions, roots, fruits, and all kinds of things, so what ended? What is the reality to which ideas of nature were pointing or in which symbols of nature were participating? An answer can be found by returning to the beginning, to the earliest appearances of the idea of nature.
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Five Theses for Emancipatory Music

1.
Music is the art of the hope for resonance: a sense that does not make sense except because of its resounding in itself.
Jean-Luc Nancy, Listening (Fordham UP, 2007), p. 67

2.
No music has the slightest esthetic worth if it is not socially true, if only as a negation of untruth; no social content of music is valid without an esthetic objectification.
Theodor Adorno, Introduction to the Sociology of Music (Seabury Press, 1976), p. 197.

3.
Percussion music is revolution. Sound and rhythm have too long been submissive to the restrictions of nineteenth-century music. Today we are fighting for their emancipation. Tomorrow, with electronic music in our ears, we will hear freedom.
John Cage, Silence (Wesleyan University Press, 1961), p. 87.

4.
In music the hegemony of the 2/4 & 4/4 beat must be overthrown. We need a new music, totally insane but life-affirming, rhythmically subtle yet powerful, & we need it now.
Hakim Bey, “Post-Anarchism Anarchy” (AOA Plenary Session, 1987).

5.
You really should be able to feel the higher power of music and be moved by it, rather than listening to me waffle on and having to explain it.
Maynard James Keenan, quoted in Steve Morse, “Sonic Evolution With the Use of Tool,” Boston Globe (11.15.96), p. D14.