Style: More Object-Oriented Linguistics

I’ve argued before that, in contrast to Ferdinand de Saussure’s principle of the arbitrariness of the sign (l’arbitraire du signe), linguistic signs are integral units that have their own meanings or virtual capacities.  In other words, it isn’t just an accident that “s” is used as a suffix to pluralize words.  There is a pluralizingContinue reading “Style: More Object-Oriented Linguistics”

Notes Toward Object-Oriented Linguistics

Words have conventional meanings, but do they also have their own meanings, apart from the meanings that humans assign to them?  For an object-oriented linguistics, a word is its own thing, distinct from any references or any speaker or listener that encounters it.  This would suggest that a word has its own meaning, its own styleContinue reading “Notes Toward Object-Oriented Linguistics”