Weird Realism: Harman and Lovecraft

I’ve been reading and enjoying Graham Harman’s new book, Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy (Zero Books, 2012).  This is a great book, regardless of whether you already know the general outline of Harman’s philosophy and/or have any interest in Lovecraft.  At the very least, I would recommend the book for Harman’s fun and illuminating usesContinue reading “Weird Realism: Harman and Lovecraft”

Occupy Romanticism

Jeffrey Robinson composed an interesting paper for a conference on poetry and revolution.  Robinson presents his radical view of Romanticism by connecting it to the Occupy movement.  Hence the title, “Occupy Romanticism” (posted on Jerome Rothenberg’s blog). A Romantic poetics of democracy thus “occupies” the traditional domains of poetry and its sentences. Just as the Occupy Movement havingContinue reading “Occupy Romanticism”

Style: More Object-Oriented Linguistics

I’ve argued before that, in contrast to Ferdinand de Saussure’s principle of the arbitrariness of the sign (l’arbitraire du signe), linguistic signs are integral units that have their own meanings or virtual capacities.  In other words, it isn’t just an accident that “s” is used as a suffix to pluralize words.  There is a pluralizingContinue reading “Style: More Object-Oriented Linguistics”

A Climbing Poem

In previous posts, I discussed the possibility of interpreting poems in terms of their poeticity (i.e. as their own integral units) and not reducing them to their references or their relations to speakers and listeners.  I also considered how this would lend itself to an object-oriented linguistics, for which poeticity does not happen only inContinue reading “A Climbing Poem”

Notes Toward Object-Oriented Linguistics

Words have conventional meanings, but do they also have their own meanings, apart from the meanings that humans assign to them?  For an object-oriented linguistics, a word is its own thing, distinct from any references or any speaker or listener that encounters it.  This would suggest that a word has its own meaning, its own styleContinue reading “Notes Toward Object-Oriented Linguistics”

To the Poems Themselves

 I am always dissatisfied with definitions of poetry that focus on how poetry expresses connections between humans and the world (and maybe God, too). I have metaphysical objections to those kind of definitions, but aside from that, I just don’t enjoy the kind of analyses that follow from them. If you define poetry in termsContinue reading “To the Poems Themselves”