Plato on Drugs, Imagination, and Ecology

There are always so many books on Plato coming out, it’s hard to keep up, especially if you’re not a devoted Plato scholar (and I’m not).  In any case, I’ve been trying to keep up with a few of the recent books on Plato.  First, a new book on Plato and ecology was recently released, William Ophuls, Plato’s Revenge:Continue reading “Plato on Drugs, Imagination, and Ecology”

Climate Change News: Doubters Debunked, Politicians Retreating

The Heartland Institute is a free-market think-tank, and one of its biggest projects is undermining climate science.  When IPCC climate scientists had emails stolen in the Climategate incident of 2009, Heartland expressed joy, saying something about how the release of those stolen documents should make people who believe in climate change reconsider (indeed, abandon) theirContinue reading “Climate Change News: Doubters Debunked, Politicians Retreating”

Unity Versus Multiplicity in Object-Oriented Ontologies

Are objects unities?  Identities?  Or, on the other hand, are they multiplicities?  This question is answered in different ways in different kinds of object-oriented ontology.  Object-oriented philosophy (represented by Graham Harman) is more focused on unities and identities, whereas onticology (represented by Levi Bryant) prefers multiplicities.  Consider Bryant’s remarks in a recent post: While objectsContinue reading “Unity Versus Multiplicity in Object-Oriented Ontologies”

Climate Change in Michigan: Buckeyes are Coming!

How do you get people in Michigan to care about climate change?  Let them know that the Buckeyes are coming. The USDA has updated their Plant Hardlines Zone Map for the first time in over a decade.  It’s the map that indicates what plants can grow in which regions of the country.  Ann Arbor hasContinue reading “Climate Change in Michigan: Buckeyes are Coming!”

Speculative Philosophy and the Specter of Religion

Reflecting on an upcoming conference, Thinking the Absolute, Levi Bryant posted some thought-provoking remarks on the implications of the speculative turn in philosophy for thinking religion.  The topic reminds me of the anthology edited by Anthony Paul Smith and Daniel Whistler, After the Postsecular and the Postmodern: New Essays in Continental Philosophy of Religion (2010).  Bryant’s concludingContinue reading “Speculative Philosophy and the Specter of Religion”

Plato and Ecstatic Trance

In a passage from the Phaedrus (265a), Socrates provides an outline of the varieties of mania, of which there are two main types, “one arising from human diseases, and the other from a divine release of customary habits.”  Although discourses such as that in the Timaeus (86b) focus on mania as a disease, specifically dementiaContinue reading “Plato and Ecstatic Trance”

A Climbing Poem

In previous posts, I discussed the possibility of interpreting poems in terms of their poeticity (i.e. as their own integral units) and not reducing them to their references or their relations to speakers and listeners.  I also considered how this would lend itself to an object-oriented linguistics, for which poeticity does not happen only inContinue reading “A Climbing Poem”

Hurry Up and Slow Down!

I like slow reading, the slow food movement, slow cookers, and other kinds of slowness.  Sloths are adorable, far from apathetic or uncaring (in contrast to the “sloth” of the Christian seven deadly sins).  Slowness is a virtue.  I agree with those scholars and activists who argue that the pervasive focus on quickness and immediacyContinue reading “Hurry Up and Slow Down!”